The real tragedy of Momo

The real tragedy of Momo

This morning scrolling down my news feed I learnt that the artist of ‘Mother Bird’ or ‘Momo’, as otherwise been dubbed has destroyed his sculpture. keisuke Aiso altruistically got rid of his masterpiece so that the curse of Momo would be banished and children everywhere would no longer have to fear her. Last week revealed that the whole disgusting suicide game seemed to be a hoax and existed due to the hype that it created through the millions of shares through social media. ( I admit to being one of these people).

Whilst the fear it brought to homes everywhere can’t be denied, the whole sorry thing has highlighted the biggest real tragedy: children using social media. As parents were urged to keep their children as young as six and seven in check on social media platforms, I sat and wondered why these children had access to platforms such as WhatsApp and Facebook in the first place.

Working in schools, I used to see primary age children trying to hide their phones so that they would not be confiscated by the Teachers. Why did they need phones in the first place?! I’m sorry but allowing your children as young as infants school age to have social media profiles and have unfiltered access to an unfiltered world is criminal in my mind. Not only are you denying them time to be a child, you are making them easy prey to the internet’s predators. Children should have time to be children. Today is world book day- a perfect time for kids to dress up as their favourite book characters, though books are on a painful decline. I know it sounds old fashioned but we should be celebrating paper, felt tips and indeed books to promote children’s imaginations. Childhood should be a time where you are not constantly worried about your self image and especially not have to face the big wide world of cyberspace. Obviously the whole concept of these phenomena are evil and predatory – but you should not be exposing your children to them in the first place by allowing them unadulterated access. I’ve seen first hand how damaging it can be and in the case of some children can lead to trauma. It’s truly heartbreaking.

Thank you for listening to my rant. If you have any questions or feel like you want to say something feel free to contact me on my page.

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